Olivia Cattabriga / Art Director

Andrew Chase

Equinox Staff

On Monday, September 30, the 2019 Annual Security Report was sent to all Keene State students’ emails. Within this report, there was an assortment of different crime statistics over the past three years.

These statistics include arson, offenses, theft, drug and alcohol violations, etc. The number of disciplinary referrals for drug-related violations on campus was 279 in 2016, 285 in 2017 and 161 in 2018. The number of disciplinary referrals for liquor law violations on campus was 573 in 2016, 405 in 2017, and 377 in 2018.

There were four accounts of aggravated assault, 10 accounts of burglary, one account of stalking and three accounts of dating violence all in 2018. There have been no accounts of arson, homicide, motor vehicle theft, domestic violence and statutory rape within the past three years. The accounts of sex offenses that were about fondling and rape were the most concerning increasing statistic.

I am fairly confident that the reason why the number of disciplinary referrals for liquor law violations on campus is so high is because drinking and partying is just what many people would consider to be the norm in college. Many people refer to Keene State as a “party school.” While these people are not completely wrong, there are still plenty of things to do that do not involve partying.

I believe that Keene State’s reputation as a party school comes from the fact that the school is  very small compared to other places such as the University Of New Hampshire. Since Keene State is very small in comparison to UNH, many people just take a quick look at the number of people partying and  think that the entire campus must party, since there are a lot of people partying. The fact of the matter is that not everyone who goes to Keene State College parties every weekend. So why should the entire college be labeled as a “party school”?

In my opinion, any minor who has been caught with a blood alcohol concentration of .02 or higher should have to pay a more expensive fine. Currently, in New Hampshire, any minor who has been caught with a blood alcohol concentration of .02 or higher for the first time has to pay a fine of at least $300. For a second time offense, the fine will be at least $600.

I believe that a first offense fine should be around $500 to $750. I also think that anyone who purchases alcohol and has the intent to give it to a minor should have to pay a fine of at least $2,000. I believe that both of these options would be more effective solutions to combat underage drinking because they punish both the supplier and seller more drastically. I hope that this will show that even though everyone else is doing it, it still doesn’t make it okay to break the law.

Andrew Chase can be contacted at achase@kscequinox.com